Time Running Out for Salvaging USS Guardian? Monsoon Winds Expected to Worsen

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Photo:ARMED FORCES OF THE PHILIPPINES

The minesweeper USS Guardian ran aground on a reef at the Tubbataha  marine park in the Sula Sea last Thursday.  The ship is still there. So far there has been no reported leaks of fuel leaks though the Navy has confirmed that multiple spaces aboard the ship have been flooded.  The worsen weather may threaten the salvage of the ship. The north east monsoon winds known as the Amihan are expected to worsen over the next few days.

As reported by GMA News: “The strong northeasterly wind and the associated big waves could affect any operation to rescue the US vessel. One thing to consider is there is another surge of the northeast monsoon this week, so expect stronger winds and heavier seas,” GMA News’ resident meteorologist Nathaniel “Mang Tani” Cruz said.

Time running out for USS Guardian in Tubbataha as Amihan winds intensify

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4 Responses to Time Running Out for Salvaging USS Guardian? Monsoon Winds Expected to Worsen

  1. Phil says:

    Taking on water was reported on Jan 21st, but only today did it roll across the screen.
    Here is the NBC post, but Huffington had a similar post:
    http://photoblog.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/01/20/16613592-report-reef-bound-navy-ship-takes-on-water?lite

  2. walt says:

    it’s a wooden hulled ship: superior non-magnetic properties of wood.
    -uncharted reefs?

  3. John Barltrop says:

    I was taught many tears ago (I am 72 now) that the monsoons are in the Southern hemisphere this time of year and it is the trade winds in the Northern hemisphere (that is in equitorial regions)……..probably something to do with climate change if the monsoons in the Northern hemisphere………but, seriously!!

  4. Rick Spilman says:

    I think you are correct. The Philippine press referred to the Amihan as northeastern monsoon winds, whereas it probably should have called them northeastern trade winds. We copied the usage from the local press, which was probably a mistake on out part, as well.

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